Semi dragging.......

shayne

Active Member
10
the responsibility should fall on the owner of the trailer, not the person driving the truck ( what if he is just a yard to yard driver making 0.55 cent per mile plus safety bonus)
 

lowmiler88

Site Supporter
30
shayne the person driving the truck is the one responsible to ensure it is save to be on the road (Circle Check) so yes he needs to be held responsible and don't get me wrong same as the owner. Both should loose their licences and never be able to work in trucking again.
 

TransAction

Well-Known Member
20
I can't even conceive any human thinking this is OK. The utter lack of common sense and total disregard of the safety of others is mind blowing!
 

coffeegurl

Member
10
The driver is totally responsible for the trailer. Did he not notice when the first came off? Let alone 2,3,4,5 &6!
Company should be held accountable for letting that piece of s**t out of the yard! Fines of $435.00? Thank god no one was injured!
 

Grandpa

Member
5
The driver is totally responsible for the trailer. Did he not notice when the first came off? Let alone 2,3,4,5 &6!
Company should be held accountable for letting that piece of s**t out of the yard! Fines of $435.00? Thank god no one was injured!
Or killed!!
 

Michael Ludwig

Well-Known Member
20
Just guessing here ...
To drivers from other parts of the world, in both incidents noted above, this is a totally acceptable way of doing business. In general they come from a lawless society with a "I want everything for me and fuck everyone else" attitude that just doesn't play well in a civilized society that is governed by rules, regulations, and morality.

No doubt someone is going to accuse me of racism for that comment, but it is not meant that way. All I am saying is that persons that grow up in a culture that is not consistent with Canadian (North American?) culture find it very difficult to assimilate. The generalization that "this is the way we always did it back home" doesn't wash here.

The government needs to step up to the plate and make sure the people coming to join our society are aware that there is a bar setting the level of civility in our culture, and that while raising that bar is totally acceptable, and even encouraged, trying to sneak under it is not.

Just my humble 2 cents worth for the day :)
 

TransAction

Well-Known Member
20
Just guessing here ...
To drivers from other parts of the world, in both incidents noted above, this is a totally acceptable way of doing business. In general they come from a lawless society with a "I want everything for me and fuck everyone else" attitude that just doesn't play well in a civilized society that is governed by rules, regulations, and morality.

No doubt someone is going to accuse me of racism for that comment, but it is not meant that way. All I am saying is that persons that grow up in a culture that is not consistent with Canadian (North American?) culture find it very difficult to assimilate. The generalization that "this is the way we always did it back home" doesn't wash here.

The government needs to step up to the plate and make sure the people coming to join our society are aware that there is a bar setting the level of civility in our culture, and that while raising that bar is totally acceptable, and even encouraged, trying to sneak under it is not.

Just my humble 2 cents worth for the day :)
Michael, not racist at all, it's the truth. I was in India on business a few years back and witnessed a situation at a job site where a high-rise was being built. On the roof there was 3 workers on a old rickety scaffolding, in the pouring rain, using a mig welder that had duct tape all along the chord sitting in a massive puddle. I wish I had a picture of it, I couldn't believe it!
 

loaders

Site Supporter
30
I guess I missed the part about that particular driver being from somewhere other than Saskatoon. An idiot, no doubt, but perhaps one of our own home grown variety. I am not so sure the majority of native born Canadians could reach (or get under if we're playing limbo) this magical bar that determines our level of civility.
 

Michael Ludwig

Well-Known Member
20
The difference is the value of life. We North Americans put a much higher value on life than many other countries and cultures in the world. I personally think, as probably most North Americans do, that's a good thing.

Years ago we used to work for Bicks' Pickles. Those little Gherkins that everyone likes come from India. Farmers there will grow, pick, sort, and ship them for $1.00 a bushel, and they'll only get a bushel a day. When I asked why so cheap, I was told that labour there is cheap. The farmers use their families as a workforce and if one child gets sick, or dies, they "just have another".

My first thought was what a horrible way to live(1). After further consideration, I came to the conclusion that as a culture they never knew, or learned, any different. That's just the way it is. Life is simply a commodity to be bought, sold, traded, exploited, or just plain used up.

When people from other countries come here, they bring that culture with them and live by it until they come to understand that here, we live by a different culture, and that just doesn't happen overnight, especially when newcomers settle into culturally oriented communities that cater to the "back home" feel.

There is so much more that newcomers should know about this country, hence my assertion that the government needs to do more, and do it faster, for new Canadians to help them assimilate into this new, multicultural assembly of citizens.

(1) Upon reflection I decided "live" is not a good term to use in this instance. Exist much better describes the life people from these countries and cultures endure.
 
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loaders

Site Supporter
30
I would agree that there are many countries in the world whose respect for life is not similar to our own. In fact I would suggest that is precisely that reason that drives many people to leave their homeland in search of a better, safer life for their families. The fact they continue to eat the same food, pray at the same church, speak the same language amongst their countrymen and perhaps wear the same clothes as they did in their homeland, does not diminish their desire to be Canadians. In time, they all start to drink Tim’s coffee, their kids play hockey and become what some refer to as “real Canadians”. In the meantime, we get to enjoy the noodles found in Chinatown, the great tailor shops in “Little Italy, the fabulous kebabs of “Greektown” and all of the other benefits that immigration brings to our country.
 
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