Wolf Encounter

tasuinam

Member
5
Need Advice - my driver had a close encounter with a large wolf while delivering a load ... can he carry bear/wolf spray for safety? He is pretty spooked... With winter coming I hear this may be frequent... any suggestions.
On the flip side - when we went camping my 10 yr old faced down a bear with her friend ... NOT RECOMMENDED .. this bear must have been just wandering they got lucky
 

Jim L

Well-Known Member
20
Where was this encounter? What do you mean by close encounter? Generally wolves do not interact with humans, especially in industrial areas - they like to be left alone. They are curious and may watch from a distance but most likely will not come out in the open.
Bear/wolf spray may be considered a weapon when crossing the border or in some jurisdictions. I would recommend not carrying these things because the problem you may have with law enforcement may be harsher and more likely than the chance of getting close enough to a wolf or bear to use it.
As with all wild animals if you stop what you are doing, look it directly in the eyes and slowly walk backward most animals will retreat and quickly get away when they feel the threat diminishing. Your 10yr old must've been in bear territory and startled the bear.
 

PackRat

Site Supporter
20
This info may be old...but Mace is illegal in Canada....however Bear Repellant and Dog Repellant are legal. (I believe it comes down to the ingredients...Capsicum VS Chemical agent) so Jim L is right...crossing the border and getting back come into play with how your driver proceeds. If he's staying in Canada short answer would be Bear Spray.
 

loaders

Site Supporter
30
“Close encounter”? The animal approached him? The driver saw the animal some distance away? As Jim L suggests, wolves are not used to humans, as say a large coyote might be, especially in an urban setting. My bet it was a healthy coyote who was curious. Any chance there were some garbage dumpsters nearby?
 

Jim L

Well-Known Member
20
If he's staying in Canada short answer would be Bear Spray.
The problem with this option is that you wouldn't carry it around with you at all times. Its one thing when you're planning to go out hiking in bear/wolf country and could expect something that you would pack this or place it in your pocket. Its totally another thing when you're not expecting anything while working and out of your truck to open the doors at the delivery location and you find a rogue animal that is curious about you. All you can say is 'shoot, I left it in the cubby of the truck'.
I think its more trouble than its worth. You're probably better off getting in the habit of taking your tire thumper and checking your tires when getting out of your truck and using that as a defensive tool on the slight chance you are faced with this situation.
 

tasuinam

Member
5
Where was this encounter? What do you mean by close encounter? Generally wolves do not interact with humans, especially in industrial areas - they like to be left alone. They are curious and may watch from a distance but most likely will not come out in the open.
Bear/wolf spray may be considered a weapon when crossing the border or in some jurisdictions. I would recommend not carrying these things because the problem you may have with law enforcement may be harsher and more likely than the chance of getting close enough to a wolf or bear to use it.
As with all wild animals if you stop what you are doing, look it directly in the eyes and slowly walk backward most animals will retreat and quickly get away when they feel the threat diminishing. Your 10yr old must've been in bear territory and startled the bear.
The wolf was about 10 ft away and snarling is what I was told. The yard is in a secluded area...I will be compiling tips and sending out to the drivers just an FYI - and yes am worried about the 'weapon' aspect...so will advise against that...just to be alert - thanks
 

tasuinam

Member
5
“Close encounter”? The animal approached him? The driver saw the animal some distance away? As Jim L suggests, wolves are not used to humans, as say a large coyote might be, especially in an urban setting. My bet it was a healthy coyote who was curious. Any chance there were some garbage dumpsters nearby?
No garbage - just a secluded yard up in PQ...but will advise to be careful - keep eyes open and be alert - Thanks
 

tasuinam

Member
5
The problem with this option is that you wouldn't carry it around with you at all times. Its one thing when you're planning to go out hiking in bear/wolf country and could expect something that you would pack this or place it in your pocket. Its totally another thing when you're not expecting anything while working and out of your truck to open the doors at the delivery location and you find a rogue animal that is curious about you. All you can say is 'shoot, I left it in the cubby of the truck'.
I think its more trouble than its worth. You're probably better off getting in the habit of taking your tire thumper and checking your tires when getting out of your truck and using that as a defensive tool on the slight chance you are faced with this situation.
Yup he actually threw the tire thumper toward him and startled him - then ran to the truck...got a flash light and completed the pre trip
 

Jim L

Well-Known Member
20
The wolf was about 10 ft away and snarling is what I was told.
A wolf, like most wild animals, doesn't snarl at someone unless approached, cornered or threatened. If it wanted to pounce a person the driver wouldn't have seen it coming and there definitely would have been more as they hunt in packs.

I don't think your driver met up with a wolf but a domesticated trained watch dog or a junk yard dog just doing his job.
 

Michael Ludwig

Well-Known Member
20
If it was in northern Quebec it very well could have been a wolf. If he was 8 to 10 feet long, nose to tip of tail, looked like it weighed 150 to 200 lbs, and it's head came up to about your driver's mid section, it was definitely a wolf.
If it was alone, it was either a very old wolf, or a very young wolf ... to old to hunt deer and elk anymore, or too young to know any better. Either way, at 10 feet, your driver was dinner.
Any other wolf would have been in a pack, and if it was a pack, your driver never would have made it to the cab.

Rule # 1 ... never turn your back and run. The moment you do that, you are prey.
Rule # 2 ... steadily back away, and don't take your eyes off the SOB.

As for your 10 year old and the bear, your kid did the right thing ... you can bluff a black bear. They're easily run off under most circumstances. If it was a Grizz though, about all you'd find would be a pair of sneakers. Never, ever, ever try to bluff a Grizzly.
 

tasuinam

Member
5
If it was in northern Quebec it very well could have been a wolf. If he was 8 to 10 feet long, nose to tip of tail, looked like it weighed 150 to 200 lbs, and it's head came up to about your driver's mid section, it was definitely a wolf.
If it was alone, it was either a very old wolf, or a very young wolf ... to old to hunt deer and elk anymore, or too young to know any better. Either way, at 10 feet, your driver was dinner.
Any other wolf would have been in a pack, and if it was a pack, your driver never would have made it to the cab.

Rule # 1 ... never turn your back and run. The moment you do that, you are prey.
Rule # 2 ... steadily back away, and don't take your eyes off the SOB.

As for your 10 year old and the bear, your kid did the right thing ... you can bluff a black bear. They're easily run off under most circumstances. If it was a Grizz though, about all you'd find would be a pair of sneakers. Never, ever, ever try to bluff a Grizzly.
Thank you - yes it was Temiskaming PQ.... I actually issued all my drivers a 'wolf/bear' encounter tip sheet - hopefully he never has to encounter wildlife
 

Michael Ludwig

Well-Known Member
20
On the lighter side ... can you imagine that driver's surprise, especially if he was city born, or not born Canadian ... Talk about a Holy Sh!it moment ... LOL
 
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