Wait time

Freight Broker

Well-Known Member
30
There are really two types of delays: The first involves chronic delays that are due to the shipper not being organized or not caring about delaying trucks. The second type are delays that are exceptional and usually due to a crane breakdown or weather or some unforseen circumstance. As regards the first cause.. I won't work with them as they tend to be hard to work for all 'round.. and the second.. they're my customer and I'm not going to charge them and make their pain worse.. I will however pay the carrier for the delay as it is not the carrier's problem.
 

lowmiler88

Site Supporter
30
We are on the customer after 1 hour of waiting so it is documented but also we do not want our drivers burning their logs sitting that is the biggest reason to keep things moving.
 

shayne

Active Member
10
Honestly; MY two cents on the matter. I have worked on both sides, assets and brokerage.

On the assets side of the business, drivers very rarely get more than 25.00/hr paid to them for waiting time, so why should SHOULD ME A BROKER HAVE TO PAY YOU THE CARRIER 65.00/HR

On the brokerage side, our clients are so damn cheap already before we start throwing 85.00/per hour extra charges at the. We always go back to give notice of additional charges. However, clients dont respond or acknowledge those warnings. They only come back 3 months later when we force them to pay up and say "i didnt know about these charges"

For assets based carrier accessorial charges shouldn't not be where you make your money on loads. Many times I have carriers miss pickup or delivery appts and try to ask for waiting time. (if you miss a set appt that is listed on my bol you have broken a legal contract I have entered with you and are not entitled to compensation of any kind)
 

loaders

Site Supporter
30
Shayne, I believe the hourly charges for wait time include not only the idle driver, but also the idle truck and trailer, hence the $65.00 +/- per hour charge. You are correct, accessorial charges should not be regarded as a profit generating revenue stream, however by the same token, not charging for costly additional services can mean zero profit on a shipment, a situation no one should tolerate.
 

Shakey

Site Supporter
20
One reason client like brokers, fight their fight with carriers for them. Assets need to be paid for the time they are used, 65/hour doesn't cover all the costs and most likely 85 doesn't either.
 

Jim L

Well-Known Member
20
Honestly; MY two cents on the matter. I have worked on both sides, assets and brokerage.

On the assets side of the business, drivers very rarely get more than 25.00/hr paid to them for waiting time, so why should SHOULD ME A BROKER HAVE TO PAY YOU THE CARRIER 65.00/HR

On the brokerage side, our clients are so damn cheap already before we start throwing 85.00/per hour extra charges at the. We always go back to give notice of additional charges. However, clients dont respond or acknowledge those warnings. They only come back 3 months later when we force them to pay up and say "i didnt know about these charges"

For assets based carrier accessorial charges shouldn't not be where you make your money on loads. Many times I have carriers miss pickup or delivery appts and try to ask for waiting time. (if you miss a set appt that is listed on my bol you have broken a legal contract I have entered with you and are not entitled to compensation of any kind)
You need to consider the loss of revenue on the truck, trailer etc. Remember, a unexpected wait time usually has a large domino effect. Consider a driver that has enough hours to get home for his son's hockey game or his favourite cousins wedding. A 2 hour waiting time delay could mean that he runs out of hours to make it back legally. No money in world be enough.

As a broker you need to be in the middle to educate your customers and carriers to take all the steps necessary to save the arguments between them. Good brokers understand that when it comes down to detention or other accessorial charges the customer wants to pay nothing and the carrier wants the world. How you manage getting that unfortunate situation settled between the customer and carrier is how you will be judged - good or bad. For example a good broker would tell the carrier if their customer takes 4 hours to unload - this way the carrier can plan and charge accordingly. If the customer takes more than 4 hours the good broker would have a contingency and process in place with the customer to pay for the additional time.
 

loaders

Site Supporter
30
Exactly Jim L. A good broker adds value to the entire transaction, to the benefit of both the carrier and the shipper. Now if it would just get a bit busier we could be adding value all over the place!!!!
 

Freight Broker

Well-Known Member
30
Most shippers I've met won't pay detention.. the thinking is that they aren't compensated when trucks are delayed so they, in turn, don't pay anything when they encounter delays on their end. Best way in the long term to deal with this is to work with efficient customers who load/offload in reasonable time. They are out there... most will handle their end in reasonable time. The other kind.. the ones who aren't organized or who simply don't care, are best avoided. They don't want to be efficient, so best leave them be. Of course, anyone can have a bad day.. a shipper who ordinarily loads in two hours might run into a problem.. in that case I always pay the carrier although i get nothing from the shipper. In my view that's the best way to handle it.. the occassional detention charge is simply a cost of doing business. And I'm not going to ruffle the feathers of my golden geese by poking them with a detention charge in their hour of distress. Nor would I expect my carrier to absorb the cost of an excessive delay.
 

wesward

Member
10
Most likely before your time Wesward, but this industry used to be very regulated and there were “standard set fees” for virtually everything associated with transportation. The down side to those days was that the market was made up of far fewer participants, meaning much less competition, and the result of that was rates were substantially higher than today. Of course now, those days are long gone and each individual company is free to set their own fees for all accessorial charges, such as waiting time and demurrage. You can still be “on the same page” as everyone else. Just ask your fellow truckers the question on this site.
I have been hearing wait time varies from $50-$75 per hour to $100-$200. I guess it would depend on what the customer is willing to pay?
 

shayne

Active Member
10
I have been hearing wait time varies from $50-$75 per hour to $100-$200. I guess it would depend on what the customer is willing to pay?
also depends on the equipment that you have standing idle onsite and the amount of time also! decks and specialized trailers charge alot for waiting time!
 
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