Truck ordered, not used.

Freight Broker

Well-Known Member
30
Most brokers if they're any good can make up the tonu loss on volume without concerning themselves with fairness. In a fair world it would cut both ways.. i.e. broker would pay carrier for a load cancellation and carrier would pay broker for truck cancellation. Doesn't work that way because.. surprise surprise.. the world is not fair. So i look at it from a cost benefit perspective only. Which is more painful.. refusing a tonu .. or losing a carrier? Fairness never enters my mind in the calculation..the tonu cost crops up every so often and is a cost of doing business.. cheaper to pay it than to kick up sand and lose a carrier and one's reputation.
 

Deisel1

New Member
2
A bit of a touchy conversation for both carriers and freight brokers. I can agree with Freight Brokers, in terms of eliminating the emotion out of the equation. On the other hand, let's be realistic, TONU, how much are you really paying? $200-$250 max? Seem hardly worth the time, especially dealing with a preferred carrier. If the opportunity arises where you can make it back from the customer than, "in fairness" sure, pay the carrier and move forward. I would also, share the same sentiment with a carrier that may not be on your preferred carrier list. Developing relationships with carriers are just as important in developing relationships with the customer. It's what makes this funny world of transportation keeps moving.
 

lowmiler88

Site Supporter
30
The way it really works is you have a meaningful conversation between the 2 parties and come to some kind of agreement whether it is $0 because the carrier was able to cover his truck with no inconvenience or the carrier needs something to keep his driver happy while looking for another load. An email on a Sunday is not notice, if you actually talked to someone then maybe but an email to an address that may not be monitored and not read till Monday morning is not 24 hours notice. I think these situations really define what kind of broker or carrier you really are and "so sad too bad" I don't think is really the way anyone wants to define their business.
 

Steph18

Member
10
Do I get a tonu when my client cancels the load?

- no i dont - why should you?
that's a pretty shitty practice to go by, anything that is cancelled day of should be getting TONU.

Many carriers go out of route miles and occur extra cost just to pickup a load given to them by a broker or customer.

You're pretty much telling carriers you don't give a shit about them with that attitude. I'm sure when you need help your going to find out real quick how little they care about helping you if that's how you treat them...
 

Freight Broker

Well-Known Member
30
The way it really works is you have a meaningful conversation between the 2 parties and come to some kind of agreement whether it is $0 because the carrier was able to cover his truck with no inconvenience or the carrier needs something to keep his driver happy while looking for another load. An email on a Sunday is not notice, if you actually talked to someone then maybe but an email to an address that may not be monitored and not read till Monday morning is not 24 hours notice. I think these situations really define what kind of broker or carrier you really are and "so sad too bad" I don't think is really the way anyone wants to define their business.
Right on.. I will do everything I can to find another load.. and then, if nothing pans out I pay the tonu.
 

MikeJr

Moderator
Staff member
30
The way it really works is you have a meaningful conversation between the 2 parties and come to some kind of agreement whether it is $0 because the carrier was able to cover his truck with no inconvenience or the carrier needs something to keep his driver happy while looking for another load. An email on a Sunday is not notice, if you actually talked to someone then maybe but an email to an address that may not be monitored and not read till Monday morning is not 24 hours notice. I think these situations really define what kind of broker or carrier you really are and "so sad too bad" I don't think is really the way anyone wants to define their business.
Yes, communication is the key. I've spoken to carriers on more than one occasion, and said - look for another load and call me back with the variance (if there is one after you factor in your time in looking for said load). This happens in a potential TONU scenerio and also the odd time freight is smaller than what the shipper estimated they would load.
The seat on the buss is paid for because that's what's booked, but if shipper short ships by 8 feet and you can fill the 8 feet, give me a little break that we can pass most of to the customer and make a little more for your employer too. This is called a win (you) - win (me) - win (my customer) - win (the new cusotmer that gets to use the 8 feet).

Again, every scenerio will have varying factors that can affect the final outcome, nothing is really black and white is it?

Keep well,
Mike
 

Freight Broker

Well-Known Member
30
I've even had one that declined my offer of a tonu..Carrier stated that he wasn't out that much and that he appreciated the offer.. He also stated that had I NOT offered the tonu he would have brought it up and insisted on being paid for it.
 

Nawk

Well-Known Member
20
I've had shippers cancel 5 minutes after I assign the load to a carrier. I call the carrier right away and they insist on a TONU.

I've had shippers cancel loads booked a week out over a weekend when they've requested a Monday morning pick up. For whatever reason... I'm unable to contact the carrier over the weekend and the carrier says "It's OK I'll find another load".

Each case is unique.

The answer: Be fair... this time... next time... every time.

And sometimes... sometimes... "the cost of doing business" is paying a TONU to your carrier even when you're not getting paid for one to keep your carrier partner happy and satisfied.

They're doing work for you and it's not all that different than when an employer calls an employee into work and for whatever reason the employee can not work through no fault of their own. The employer still pays you for 4 hours.
 
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TransAction

Well-Known Member
20
We also handle these situations on a one off basis depending on the situation and all good points here. What I find difficult is dealing with customers who use the "big boys" and common carriers where they state "My other carrier doesn't charge for this". After that, we have to explain, yes, but we are using smaller regional carriers who can't so easily recover from a cancelled load. Also, because we have used these same carriers in the past for you, the communication is quicker, they don't nickel and dime you for waiting time after 15 mins, don't charge you a driver assist fee as just because the driver wants to be helpful to unload the freight and they are flexible when dealing with other inherent issues in this industry, so Mr. Customer, you've actually saved quite a bit over the years using these carriers and from time to time, this is a minimal fee compared to what it actually costs them on a last minute cancellation.
 
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