Truck ordered, not used.

loaders

Site Supporter
30
I am trying to get a feel for what other members consider to be adequate notice of a load cancellation. Certainly "last minute" notice, where the truck is either on site to load or enroute to the shipper needs to be charged a TONU. But what about when some additional heads ups is offered? For example, I booked a load with you last Friday for Monday pick up. Over the weekend I received an urgent email from my shipper advising me that the freight will not be ready (put in your own reason here) as promised for Monday pick up. Being a good broker, I send an email to the carrier over the weekend and follow up first thing Monday morning with a phone call confirming the bad news. In this hypothetical, but unfortunately oh so common situation, assuming the carrier is still getting unloaded at his delivery, have I provided them with enough notice to prevent a TONU charge? If the carrier got emptied over the weekend and the driver was either banking some off duty hours, or having an extra coffee before sauntering to get loaded, I get it, TONU. My question is, how much advance notice is enough? Once we have successfully wrestled this question to the mat, we can start with the converse question, how much notice should a carrier give a shipper/broker that they are bailing on the load they accepted?*****just joking**** ( maybe)
 
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MikeJr

Moderator
Staff member
30
If I was not participating in a Biggest Loser challenge here at the office and also not on a Whole30 meal plan which excludes alcohol I'd hook up for a scotch and cigar for this discussion.

Short version, if a carrier (or also a customer) is willing and able to give us their after hours phone/email contact info, that WILL be used evenings and weekends and in your scenerio above notification on the weekend by said method would help in avoiding the TONU charge (as you have offered reasonable notice). I get emails on the weekend occasionally from carriers that are telling me they are not picking up loads on Monday or driver is not going out because (insert reason here). We thank them for contacting us on the weekend and relay the info to the customer/receiver. Of course, we track the frequency of this for many reasons. We're a 24 hour industry and need to be in contact with people 'as soon as' changes are required.

Oh, in your scenerio above, I'm sure once the load is ready, you offer first dibbs on the load to the carrier that was willing and able to do it in the first place, ya?

Keep well sir,
Mike
 

loaders

Site Supporter
30
Absolutely, unless of course this is a carrier trying to charge me with a TONU after giving ample advance notice of the load cancellation.
 

lowmiler88

Site Supporter
30
I don't think telling a carrier by email on Sunday that the load will not be ready for Monday should be considered enough notice. The carrier and driver have an expectation on Friday they have a load and have not looked anywhere else so chances are there will be at least a few hours to find a replacement load. To me compensation should be offered.
 

loaders

Site Supporter
30
In my example, the weekend email was also followed up by a Monday morning phone call, say by 8:00AM carrier local time. If the carrier was still in the process of getting unloaded, is this enough notice of the cancelled load??
 

shayne

Active Member
10
I don't think telling a carrier by email on Sunday that the load will not be ready for Monday should be considered enough notice. The carrier and driver have an expectation on Friday they have a load and have not looked anywhere else so chances are there will be at least a few hours to find a replacement load. To me compensation should be offered.
Sorry thats the cost of doing business
 

MikeJr

Moderator
Staff member
30
Every situation is and will be judged on it's own particulars. I'm referring to having after hours contact information that allows me to give a real time update to a supplier to help them plan their drivers.

I just now approved a TONU for a carrier and they are not on site for the pickup. They were to pick up between 2PM and 3PM and we were notified of the cancellation at 2:30PM. It's a GTA to GTA shipment, but truck was clearly rolling to pickup so of course we compensate for no load to pick up.

Every situation will be a little different, just try and be fair to all parties as best you can.

Keep well,
Mike
 

Freight Broker

Well-Known Member
30
I don't think there's one answer to cover all possible scenarios. I had a situation last week where a load was cancelled while the truck had arrived at the shipper. After a couple of hours (it was 11:00 pm at that point) carrier called me in a panic.. "load isn't ready to go" he said. I called the shipper and got a moron who curtly stated "load ain't ready.. what do you want me to do?". Off course, I had to draw a diagram for him.. i.e. maybe see if there's another load available.. he told me to call back someone with a brain in the morning. I did.. but only got an 75 IQ person who referred me to an 85 and finally after 30 minutes got someone who may not pass for retarded in most social settings. He carefully looked at the loads available and stated "golly.. we got a hot load here that could have loaded last night". I told him to put me on it.. called the carrier back and he seemed satisfied albeit not completely happy about losing the night. So I guess I try to find them another load or worst case pay the TONU..
 

loaders

Site Supporter
30
The vast majority of our customers will pay TONU, provided the situation warrants it, i.e., last minute notice. If they provided 24+hrs, regardless if over the weekend, a TONU charge would be declined.
 

BPOVFB

Member
10
Freight Broker nailed it. Everyone remembers that broker - just as every broker remembers that carrier. If you want a relationship with carriers - you pay it (if warranted) and make it up through future loads - whether or not you charge your customer is not a part of the relationship concern. If there is no opportunity for future business between the two parties - then I could see how people may value/view it differently.
 

Rob

Site Supporter
30
Do I get a tonu when my client cancels the load?

- no i dont - why should you?
Do I get a tonu when my client cancels the load?

- no i dont - why should you?

Sounds like an answer from a real solid guy to work for. Between this and all your I can double broker your loads for you. I get outbound done at 150 a mile. I make my money making carrier take shitty rates on inbound. You sir sound like a real solid guy that everyone should be just jumping to do business with. Either that or a douchebag not sure which one that is all for Shayne and fuck the carriers they ARE A DIME A DOZEN.
 

BPOVFB

Member
10
I'm sure Shayne will share where he works Rob, that way you can avoid him. I mean - that's what someone does who stands by their values does!
 

bull958

Site Supporter
20
Sounds like an answer from a real solid guy to work for. Between this and all your I can double broker your loads for you. I get outbound done at 150 a mile. I make my money making carrier take shitty rates on inbound. You sir sound like a real solid guy that everyone should be just jumping to do business with. Either that or a douchebag not sure which one that is all for Shayne and fuck the carriers they ARE A DIME A DOZEN.
I've said it before Rob. Can you just stop beating around the bush and tell us what's on your mind?
 

loaders

Site Supporter
30
Geez, I really didn't want this post to be anything more than a scholarly discussion about what constitutes reasonable notice of a cancelled load. As I assumed from the get go, there are too many variables to make an exact assessment and as such we will continue to deal with these situations individually as they arise.
Shayne, keep in mind that there are many carriers on this site who at some point in their careers were treated poorly, unfairly or even criminally by a less than reputable freight broker. As they they all have long and very sharp memories, it might be best to temper your comments regarding rates, waiting time, TONU, etc so that you do not appear to be one of those less than reputable brokers ( which of course, you are not) that they remember oh so well.
 
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