Posts too old to be relevant need to be archived.

Michael Ludwig

Well-Known Member
20
Been noticing lately that there is not a lot of new action on this board. However there seems to be a lot of recent posts commenting on threads that are too old to be relevant any longer.
Archive, and lock, topics over a year old. That should leave them available for research, but unable to be commented on. That way people (myself included) don't drag up old threads or mistakenly react to posts that may or may not be valid anymore.
If there are posts that remain valid over a significant amount of time, they can be stickied to maintain an active status.
 

loaders

Site Supporter
30
"stickied"????? Is that some new techo-babble that I was unaware of? Last time I heard anything like it was when my 2 year old grandson was complaining about his Popsicle melting all over him!
 

loaders

Site Supporter
30
Great thing about this site.....you can learn something new everyday! Stick, sticky, stickied. Who’d have ever thought?
 

Ruler

Member
10
Agree older posts should be either deleted or archive as there tends to be alot of old information that is no longer relevant, useful or even correct
 

bellcitytransport

Active Member
15
I agree. Companies evolve, personnel change. etc. They should be retained for reference but be locked for commenting. If there is a new more recent incident that a person wants to bring to light, start a new thread.
 

jonny-chicken

Site Supporter
15
Perhaps I'm the only one who's not into this idea... depending on the topic anyway... I don't think anyone wants to reactivate an old thread about some new regulation or something that is now old news...

But there are sometimes where it is helpful to have everything in one place...

I will often reactivate an old thread, rather than start a new one with the same topic...

For instance... I was looking for payment trends about a certain company so I searched and found some threads that were a year or two old. From there I was able to see how this company was viewed in the past and what responses they may have posted.

When the same company was late on payment and I wanted to post something about it, I went to the same post I read from a year or two ago, and put my post there, rather than start a new post for the same purpose as the old one.

This way, all users can view the entire chronology of this company's payment history, without having to search multiple times and view different threads to piece it all together.

There's my 2 cents...
 

AccountsReceivable@DRC

Moderator
Staff member
20
Keep in mind the dates of the threads. When you see a new post from 2020 when the last remark was in 2014 - one can 'assume' alot of company history and/or details have changed. We need the archive and past history here. If a thread is closed off due to inactivity postings or just 'too old' - you are going to get duplicate postings being created (when searching a company name). I'd prefer one longer thread under a specific header than using the search engine and a whole bunch of various postings come up.

I always check the date of the previous post when a new post is added to an older thread. Perhaps @Michael Ludwig - we are turning into "old threads" on this board. Oldies but goodies.

;)
 

Michael Ludwig

Well-Known Member
20
"Perhaps @Michael Ludwig - we are turning into "old threads" on this board. Oldies but goodies."
;)
I don't know about you guys, but I am definitely turning into an "old thread' ... LOL

You are correct about keep the dates of old threads in mind, however, there has been significant activity as of late that indicates members, mostly new, are not considering old thread dates at all, and are simply rehashing outdated information, and quite possibly making business decisions on information that, at best, is errant, and at worst, outright false.

I am simply stating (questioning?) that perhaps there is a way to archive information that is older and no longer relevant that would stop it from being actioned on, but is still available for research and/or historical reference.

The downside is that people, like JC and Igor, would have to piece together the research as opposed to having it available in one continuous, never-ending thread.
 
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Michael Ludwig

Well-Known Member
20
A case in point ...
 
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