Overlength Wheelbase

alx2

Member
5
I have heard that Ontario has repealed the over lenght law on tractors having a wheelbase over 244 inches , pulling a 53 foot trailer.

Can anyone confirm or let me know where to look in the Myriad Ontario ministries?
 
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lowmiler88

Site Supporter
30
OTA Applauds MTO Move to Extended Tractor Wheelbases for SPIF Configurations
Good for environment and harmonization

(June 25, 2012, Toronto) – The Ontario Ministry of Transportation has taken the first big step to allow the use of tractors with longer wheelbases. The province passed a regulatory amendment, which will take effect July 1, 2012, to allow longer wheelbase tractors for single, tandem and tridem semi-trailer configurations.
The change is designed to accommodate environmental devices and add-ons that are essential in reducing greenhouse gases, while meeting or exceeding MTO’s turning performance standards and all other HTA dimensional criteria.
Under the change, the maximum allowable tractor wheelbase will increase from 6.2 m (244 in.) to 7.2 m (282 in.) for vehicles classed as SPIF1 (Safe, Productive and Infrastructure Friendly) Designated Tractor-Trailer Combinations – i.e., single, tandem and tridem tractor/fixed axle semi-trailer configurations.
To accommodate for the longer tractors, MTO is using a well-established formula used in other jurisdictions which reduces trailer wheelbase as tractor wheelbase increases, allowing the configuration to negotiate turns the same as any other vehicle. Currently, all other Canadian provinces allow a longer wheelbase tractor, although all but one (Nova Scotia) only do so by special permit. (There is no maximum tractor wheelbase requirement in the United States).
The Ontario Trucking Association had been seeking changes to the maximum wheelbase restrictions in order to allow the industry the flexibility to accommodate recently introduced truck engine technologies like particulate traps, urea tanks, selective catalytic reduction canisters, diesel exhaust fluid tanks and other devices like auxiliary power units (APUs) to meet emission standards aimed at reducing greenhouse gases.
The change was welcomed by OTA, whose president, David Bradley, said: “The configurations MTO has moved forward on represent approximately 85 per cent of the trailer fleet operating in Ontario.”
OTA has already begun work with MTO to determine the feasibility of allowing longer wheelbase tractors on other SPIF configurations including tri-axles, quad-axles, five, six-axle and B-train configurations.
Together these components can occupy up to two metres (80") of frame rail space, or half of the area between steer and drive axles currently available to carriers on a 6.2-metre wheelbase tractor. This impinges on space typically reserved for fuel tanks, air supply tanks, batteries and other equipment and makes spec’ing a vehicle very difficult. Spec'ing APUs on tractors with a sleeper berth (essential for combatting fatigue by long-haul truck drivers) is also a particular challenge. Emerging technologies like hybrids and LNG vehicles may also create pressure on trucks’ frame rail space.
To view the official MTO regulatory amendment, click here.
 

alx2

Member
5
Thanks for the info

I cannot find your link to the MTO site.
Can you re post this.

I would like to have this when I present myself in Provincial court tomorrow to defend a $575.00 ticket for the wheelbase being 5 57/64" too long on a 1994 tractor with over 4 million kilometers traveled under Quebec plates.

The law has changed at least 4 times since 1994 and the most recent change that went into effect January 1st 2010, applies to all vehicles manufactured prior to 1999.

Hopefully, I can impress the judge noting the change in Ontario and Wall Mart coming out with 60" trailers. Quebec's own indecision on it's protocol regarding what is safe.
 
Just a question...How did they measure the wheelbase?
How did they ensure the front wheel hubs were perpendicular to vehicle? did they measure both sides? Did they measure the spread and subtract 1/2?
If unit was air ride, did they ensure the suspension was at operating height? (axle walk).
Sounds anal, but anal is what they do. There are a lot of ways to error an inch here and there. (Is the tractor really 249?), and the law allows 244.1". All you have to do is prove their measurement wrong. You shouldnt have to prove by how much.
 

alx2

Member
5
Dave

I believe that the inspector took a measuring tape and had our driver help.
The wheelbase is indicated on the sticker on the inside of the door and it is 250 inches.
Anyway it is too long.

I have several plans of defence; the main one being that we went through a thorough inspection back in 2008 at the same scale where dimensions are clearly checked off and the vehicle combination passed.
Of course we were governed by the 2004 rules, not they new 2010 ruling , that all government bodies omitted advising us of.

Secondly, the mandate of the regulations covering weights and dimensions transport in Quebec are there to protect the safety of those on the road and infrastructures.
How does one achieve this goal of increased safety by issuing a special permit for $160.00, without doing anything else whatsoever I will let the prosecuting attorney explain!
 

rickwill

Active Member
10
I believe that the inspector took a measuring tape and had our driver help.
The wheelbase is indicated on the sticker on the inside of the door and it is 250 inches.
Anyway it is too long.

I have several plans of defence; the main one being that we went through a thorough inspection back in 2008 at the same scale where dimensions are clearly checked off and the vehicle combination passed.
Of course we were governed by the 2004 rules, not they new 2010 ruling , that all government bodies omitted advising us of.

Secondly, the mandate of the regulations covering weights and dimensions transport in Quebec are there to protect the safety of those on the road and infrastructures.
How does one achieve this goal of increased safety by issuing a special permit for $160.00, without doing anything else whatsoever I will let the prosecuting attorney explain!
You didn't say where your truck was ticketed, I'm guessing Quebec. I'm uncertain as to when Quebec implemented their 244 law but as stated the $160 permit makes it legal (gov't & large companies B. S.) make these types of rulings.

In Ontario any truck manufactured before Jan 1, 2006 can be over 244" W/B but can't pull a 53' trailer (who'd want to). It's amazing how an Owner/Operator or small trucking firm can't have sharp & longer trucks in the name of safety BUT the large carriers can haul TWO 53' WITH A CONVERTER down the highway & be considered safe & green.

To really top it off the governing bodies backed by large corporate carriers are allowing these same 53' and longer combinations to have 4 feet of duck tails at the rear doors & call it helping the envirement - BULL SH___T. If the transportation minister had any smarts he'd outlaw 53' trailers, plus double 53' trailers & allow any length wheelbase tractor to pull 48' trailers or two 28'.
 
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