C.H. Robinson - Robbing Carriers (IL Office)

martinetav

Well-Known Member
#21
I've had one ask me for a rate recently. When I gave it to him he said 'why so High. Everyone else is giving me rates that are 5 to 7 hundred dollars less'. I answered him ' well, then why are you asking me to rate it... ' to which I got no answer. And, I added that if they wanted us to haul the freight, then that was our rate. Then I got the new speech that we have been getting recently ; but what with fuel going down so much blah blah blah blah... To which I answered him ; well, as the fuel rate is going down, so has the worth of the Canadian Dollar. You pay me in Canadian dollars. My Canadian dollar is worth only .75 these day so, in reality, fuel rates have gone up for Canadian carriers as well as tolls, bridge crossing, fuel taxes, ifta etc. I'm always amazed when I realize that these guys have no idea of all of the costs, other than fuel, a carrier has to pay out when hauling a load in the U.S.
 

martinetav

Well-Known Member
#22
Sure they could..but for some reason many don't. My point is that having your name on the ownership doesn't necessarily give you more control. Control involves the ability to plan and to manage...and that can be done by a broker as well as a carrier. I have no trouble getting and keeping large accounts based on my ability to manage and control the desired outcome better than my supplier carriers can...
freight broker, you seem to be a bit full of yourself. We carriers can and often do have to clean up the Broker's mess. Apts taken without consulting the carrier. determining that this can be moved within a certain amount of time... often calculated like an 18 wheeler drives like a car... and doesn't have a log book to fill out. Never taking into consideration that the Driver doesn't open his day when the shipper has finished loading him. You (brokers) often seem to think that we have done nothing else during the day. You know, like deliver something somewhere else. Rare are the brokers that realize that our time is worth something and that we should get paid for the 6 to 10 hours we waited to get loaded. And that the driver's log book hours have been eaten and that he is even taking a chance to leave the shipper to get to the nearest truck stop, which is probably full by the way...
Most of the time, the Freight Broker is the one that makes all of the money. How many truck drivers do you see with a Porche parked in the yard ???
 

Freight Broker

Well-Known Member
#23
freight broker, you seem to be a bit full of yourself. We carriers can and often do have to clean up the Broker's mess. Apts taken without consulting the carrier. determining that this can be moved within a certain amount of time... often calculated like an 18 wheeler drives like a car... and doesn't have a log book to fill out. Never taking into consideration that the Driver doesn't open his day when the shipper has finished loading him. You (brokers) often seem to think that we have done nothing else during the day. You know, like deliver something somewhere else. Rare are the brokers that realize that our time is worth something and that we should get paid for the 6 to 10 hours we waited to get loaded. And that the driver's log book hours have been eaten and that he is even taking a chance to leave the shipper to get to the nearest truck stop, which is probably full by the way...
Most of the time, the Freight Broker is the one that makes all of the money. How many truck drivers do you see with a Porche parked in the yard ???
Not full of myself, just saying it like it is. I don't speak for all brokers, only myself. Your time is worth something, as is my time. However you fail to realize we all get paid for outcomes and not for bad luck or time on the job. That holds true for all of us. If you get hung up somewhere because a crane broke is it the broker's job to make it right? If you break down and the load is three days late do you compensate the broker/shipper? No and no. Bad luck and circumstances over which we have no control affect us all, and we cannot expect the other parties involved to make it all right for us. The hard reality is that your time is worth something to YOU.. but not to anyone else. Only your productive output is worth something to your customer. And likewise for myself.. my time invested in a given load is of no consequence to my customers... only my ability to manage their freight is of interest and of value to them. I don't know if brokers do so well... all I can tell you is that I do quite well.. and that's because I don't have the "I need to be compensated when things go wrong" mindset. Rather, I think in terms of fixing the problem for my customer or avoiding it altogether. For example, let's go back to the broken crane. My truck arrives to find the crane is broken and he is going to be delayed. The carrier gets on the phone and starts crying about being compensated for his time. I make a couple of calls, and within the hour have another crane on the way... problem solved. Who does the customer think is 10 feet tall with a full head of hair? Yup.. me. Who do you think is richer.. me or the crier?
 
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martinetav

Well-Known Member
#25
Not full of myself, just saying it like it is. I don't speak for all brokers, only myself. Your time is worth something, as is my time. However you fail to realize we all get paid for outcomes and not for bad luck or time on the job. That holds true for all of us. If you get hung up somewhere because a crane broke is it the broker's job to make it right? If you break down and the load is three days late do you compensate the broker/shipper? No and no. Bad luck and circumstances over which we have no control affect us all, and we cannot expect the other parties involved to make it all right for us. The hard reality is that your time is worth something to YOU.. but not to anyone else. Only your productive output is worth something to your customer. And likewise for myself.. my time invested in a given load is of no consequence to my customers... only my ability to manage their freight is of interest and of value to them. I don't know if brokers do so well... all I can tell you is that I do quite well.. and that's because I don't have the "I need to be compensated when things go wrong" mindset. Rather, I think in terms of fixing the problem for my customer or avoiding it altogether. For example, let's go back to the broken crane. My truck arrives to find the crane is broken and he is going to be delayed. The carrier gets on the phone and starts crying about being compensated for his time. I make a couple of calls, and within the hour have another crane on the way... problem solved. Who does the customer think is 10 feet tall with a full head of hair? Yup.. me. Who do you think is richer.. me or the crier?
So to be brief, you hire an excuse... so that you can say 'IT'S NOT MY FAULT ....' like I said, a bit full of yourself. All you did here is list a bunch of daily hazards that truck drivers have to deal with everyday while on the road. The things that you NEVER take into consideration when counting how much time it takes to get there. You make promised to impress your customer that no truck driver would make because they know that there are to many variables. My cup runneth over with your uneducated promises. . . You'll soon need new door ways in order to get you big head through. You are one of the ones that give no credit to the driver.
and by the way. You don't manage their freight. the Shipper and the trucking company's drivers do that work. You manage a bank account...
Do you even know what a truck looks like inside. Have you ridden even one mile in a truck. . .
I have a few names in my mind to discribe you but I'll keep them to myself. I'd be wasting my time anyway. You are already convinced that without you the trucking industry would go to hell... I would say that you are part of the problem, not a part of the solution
 

Freight Broker

Well-Known Member
#26
In trucking for over 30 years.. drove from 1984 to 2001. Still drive occasionally for friends and former employers. So I know a little bit about trucks and trucking. What promises are you talking about? I haven't made any here... just tried to explain the facts of life to you a little.. namely.. that the money flows to those who solve problems and not to those who demand compensation for every act of God beyond anyone's control. If that offends you then so be it. There's just no money in being a pisser.. Sometimes I too take it on the chin when things fall through... but I don't go around asking for compensation from my customer or my carrier. As best I can, I try to minimize the damage.. and really that's all one can do. As I said, I've been in this racket for over 30 years and have done very well, thanks to the customers and carriers who CHOOSE to work with me every day of the week (see... I'm giving credit). Now stop bitchin like a simpering ninny.. life's a bitch.. hold your head up and own your successes and failures!
 

MikeJr

Moderator
Staff member
#27
People:

Keep the personal attacks out of this please. You are certainly entitled to your opinion regarding different parties roles in this industry but lets keep the school yard antics to the children.

Also, I don't care to take the time to edit your posts, we all have real work to do! :)

Keep well,
Mike
 
#28
Freight Broker

The reason we carriers pick up the phone and advise you of a problem at either a shipper or consignee as soon as it arises, isn't because we want to "start crying about being compensated". We do it because it's our duty to keep the broker informed of what's happening with their load and to see if their customer can remedy the issue. And yes, we also make it very clear with most brokers what the financial implications can be, such as the hourly rate for waiting time, that way they can go to their customer well before any waiting time accrues and advise them about what they are looking at as far as costs. And this way once the load is delivered, nobody can come back to the carrier and throw out the old "oh, I know you said it was $60.00 per hour, but my customer just got back to me and said they are only willing to pay $25.00 per hour". Isn't it really funny how you only ever get told that AFTER the load has delivered???
 

Freight Broker

Well-Known Member
#29
I appreciate that Robsan. And I appreciate carriers who keep me apprised of problems as they arise. That way I'm able to stay on top of them. I'm talking about those people who simply start making demands as soon as problems arise without offering any kind of solution. and I'm not singling out carriers.. I'm talking about all people who (when something goes sideways) throw their hands in the air and start making demands for compensation. You must know the kind I mean... there are brokers among them too.
 
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Jim L

Active Member
#33
Time for me to chime in.
The facts are:
-there are good carriers and some not so good
-there are good brokers and some not so good
-there are good shippers/receivers and some not so good.
We all have to deal with them.

Problems exist and solving them is paramount to the whole process. Every situation is different.

I have had bad situations too, usually because of bad information. We all have been to a location 4 hours before a delivery appointment, been to a location and the crane will not come out, the customer doesn't have room in the warehouse, the receiver closed today at 12 noon on a Friday for a staff picnic, the list can go on forever and ever. We all need to work through these and figure out who are the good people to work with and who to avoid.

The problem is that the carrier usually gets stuck paying cold hard cash for the waiting time to a driver, losing the backhaul, decreased productivity etc, etc. The broker, although most understand it, have a hard time turning those cold hard cash costs into cash for the carrier.

On the other hand, I'm sure brokers have had carriers who said they'd make it on time only to find out the hard way that the driver isn't even close. This puts added pressure on the broker to either come clean or make up a new believable story. Who really knows if the customer short pays their invoice because of it.

On both sides of the spectrum I have bit the bullet a lot of times and it hurts. Sometimes we just need to hear the good honest truth and take it on the chin as a team. Hopefully we learn from it and never have it happen again.

Just my two cents...
 

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