$2 lb

#21
going slightly back to the beginning of the post, it was written that the second version would be how this would be claimed. Liable for $ 2000 because it goes by the total weight of the shipment. How can the claim be against the total shipment when only 50 units were damaged. Would it not be 50 units x weight of units - equalling total weight x $ 2/ lb ? I can't see how if 50 units were damaged, you would factor in the total weight of the shipment to cover the loss. Also.. another question. If the shipper secured the units, would he not be responsible at this point ? and second off. they brought the freight back and had it swapped out for good product. Is it written anywhere that the damaged product was returned ? if not, in the case with a shipper being a ****, could you not say I picked up 100 units and delivered 100 units.. prove I damaged 50. ? ? ?
 

lowmiler88

Site Supporter
#22
Hey Friendly they do the $2 lb on the total weight of the BOL, not sure why but we deal with every major LTLer in the country and they are all the same. As far as the rest of your comments we treat people they way we want to be treated so if the customer is an ass then treat them the same. But like i said earlier let the insurance company deal with it that is what they are there for.
 
#23
so if I have 2 skids ( each weighing 100 lbs per skid ) and 1 skid gets damaged with a cost of $ 500. We would be able to claim 200 lbs x $ 2.00 per lb for $ 400 ?

I thought you could only claim the 100 lb skid times $ 2.00 / lb for $ 200 claim.
 

pitbull99

Site Supporter
#26
I want to thank everyone for their posts on our problem. Their are many different views on this. We do not have a BOL, we do not have anything that says we damaged anything, BUT we want to do the right thing.
Because of the different points of view, we have turned it over to our Insurance company, and when it is said and done, I will post what I found out and the results. Thanks again.
 
#27
I want to thank everyone for their posts on our problem. Their are many different views on this. We do not have a BOL, we do not have anything that says we damaged anything, BUT we want to do the right thing.
Because of the different points of view, we have turned it over to our Insurance company, and when it is said and done, I will post what I found out and the results. Thanks again.
You've done the right thing. Let the "big-boys"fight it out. That's what you pay them for.
 

Michael Ludwig

Well-Known Member
#28
Update, We loaded 100 units and the shipper secured the load with a strap. Driver pulled away from dock closed the doors, pulled out onto the street and heard a noise in the back.(product on wheels). The driver pulled over to the side of the road and looked into the back of the trailer and seen that the strap let go from the wall. The driver then went right back to the shippers. The shipper took off the 50 damaged units and replaced them with new ones, secured the freight again and the driver left. NOW the shipper wants paid in full for the damaged units because we do not have a BOL. They are saying we gave up our rights to the $2 / lb because we do not have a BOL. I would appreciate anyone thoughts on this. Thanks
Coming late to the party ... Don't know how this ever worked out for you, hopefully to your benefit, but your shipper is 100% correct. Without the bill of lading you are liable for whatever they want to charge.
 

loaders

Site Supporter
#29
Remember, the Bill of Lading is also referred to as "the contract of carriage". Like any "contract", it should be fully understood, and fully completed by all the parties to it, shipper, carrier (or his agent....the driver) and consignee. Unfortunately, in the real world, it has become just another piece of paper 99.9% of the time. Whenever any carrier gets their drivers together for a meeting, it might be good idea to remind them that the B/L is a whole lot more important than just a piece of paper with the receivers signature on it.
 

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